Three Differences Between Managers and Leaders

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Here’s a great article from Harvard Business Review that makes the distinction between a mere manager and a leader.

Peter Drucker once said ‘ Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things’.

Vineet Nayar’s own definition is quite spot on too.

A young manager accosted me the other day. “I’ve been reading all about leadership, have implemented several ideas, and think I’m doing a good job at leading my team. How will I know when I’ve crossed over from being a manager to a leader?” he wanted to know.

I didn’t have a ready answer and it’s a complicated issue, so we decided to talk the next day. I thought long and hard, and came up with three tests that will help you decide if you’ve made the shift from managing people to leading them.

Counting value vs Creating value. You’re probably counting value, not adding it, if you’re managing people. Only managers count value; some even reduce value by disabling those who add value. If a diamond cutter is asked to report every 15 minutes how many stones he has cut, by distracting him, his boss is subtracting value.

By contrast, leaders focuses on creating value, saying: “I’d like you to handle A while I deal with B.” He or she generates value over and above that which the team creates, and is as much a value-creator as his or her followers are. Leading by example and leading by enabling people are the hallmarks of action-based leadership.

Circles of influence vs Circles of power. Just as managers have subordinates and leaders have followers, managers create circles of power while leaders create circles of influence.

The quickest way to figure out which of the two you’re doing is to count the number of people outside your reporting hierarchy who come to you for advice. The more that do, the more likely it is that you are perceived to be a leader.

Leading people vs Managing work. Management consists of controlling a group or a set of entities to accomplish a goal. Leadership refers to an individual’s ability to influence, motivate, and enable others to contribute toward organizational success. Influence and inspiration separate leaders from managers, not power and control.

In India, M.K. Gandhi inspired millions of people to fight for their rights, and he walked shoulder to shoulder with them so India could achieve independence in 1947. His vision became everyone’s dream and ensured that the country’s push for independence was unstoppable. The world needs leaders like him who can think beyond problems, have a vision, and inspire people to convert challenges into opportunities, a step at a time.

I encouraged my colleague to put this theory to the test by inviting his team-mates for chats. When they stop discussing the tasks at hand — and talk about vision, purpose, and aspirations instead, that’s when you will know you have become a leader.

Vineet Nayar is the founder of the Sampark Foundation based in Delhi, and the former CEO of HCL Technologies. He is the author of Employees First, Customers Second. Follow Vineet at twitter.com/vineetnayar.

Source : https://hbr.org/2013/08/tests-of-a-leadership-transiti

The 10 skills you’ll need for the jobs of 2020 (and why we’re going to need them)

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Written by Peter Harris
Posted on May 17, 2014

Demographics, cultural trends, and new technologies are rapidly changing the job market.

People are living much longer than we used to. New technologies and automation are rapidly replacing repetitive jobs. New communication tools are eliminating formerly popular mediums for disseminating information (good-bye printed newspapers) at the same time as requiring more advanced media literacy skills for most new jobs.

These are going to create a massive shift in the kinds of jobs that we do – and in the skills that we will need to do them – in the very near future.

Our friends over at The Top 10 Online Colleges have put together a report summarizing the biggest drivers of change causing upheaval on the job market, and the most important on-the-job skills we will need to develop to thrive in the jobs of 2020.

The 10 essential skills for the careers of the near future:

Sense-making: The ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed.

Social intelligence: The ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions.

Novel and adaptive thinking: A proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based.

Cross cultural competency: The ability to operate in different cultural settings.

Computational thinking: The ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data based reasoning.

New Media Literacy: An ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication.

Transdisciplinary: Literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

Design Mindset: Ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes.

Cognitive load management: Ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functions

Virtual collaboration: Ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team.

Source : http://careers.workopolis.com/advice/infographic-the-10-skills-youll-need-for-the-jobs-of-2020-and-why-were-going-to-need-them/

Why Every Company Needs a Dream Manager

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We’re now accepting submissions for our 2016 Top Company Cultures list. Think your company should be on it? Apply Now »

Increasing employee engagement, creating a healthier culture and building a world-class organization that sees exceptional growth every year is what all leaders in any industry wants for their organization. If that is the goal for most leaders, then why do so few organizations succeed at the above three?

There are a ton of reasons that may be hindering an organizations success, but one key area that majority of companies completely neglect or refuse to pay any attention to is their employees’ personal dreams and desires.

Related: 10 Examples of Companies With Fantastic Cultures

I recently spent some time with Infusionsoft at their headquarters in Chandler, Arizona. You may have heard of them already, but Infusionsoft is a complete sales and marketing automation software for small businesses. I was completely blown away by their positive and healthy culture, employees and everyone’s eagerness to build the company to even greater success.

There are plenty of people who deserve credit for the culture at Infusionsoft, especially their CEO Clate Mask. What took me by surprise though was to find out that they have someone on staff who is actually labeled as their dream manager. Dan Ralphs, who is the dream manager at Infusionsoft, has one job description — to help the employees of the company achieve their personal dreams.

One of the company’s employees a few years back had read The Dream Manager by bestselling author Matthew Kelly. He loved the book so much that he desperately wanted to get it in the hands of Clate Mask, the CEO of the company. Being an avid reader and leader who is always looking to grow himself, Clate accepted the book and read it on a flight. Once he was finished with the book, he immediately knew that Infusionsoft was going to going to have a dream manager on staff.

In the book, Kelly writes, “The future of your organization and the potential of your employees are intertwined — their destinies are linked.” At Infusionsoft, you see this clearly, as employees are actively engaged in the workplace while passionately helping the organization build towards the grander vision while in return, the organization is passionately helping employees work towards their biggest personal dreams.

When talking to some of the employees at Infusionsoft, I would hear things such as, “I ran my first marathon because of Infusionsoft” or “I am almost out of debt because of Infusionsoft.” Hearing some of the personal dreams that have been accomplished is truly astonishing. Infusionsoft isn’t making miracles happen to make dreams come true for their employees, but they do show them that they immensely care about them as people and want to provide them with the resources and tools to help them achieve some of their biggest dreams in life. In return, they have employees who are extremely passionate about the company that they work for and are actively engaged in the workplace.

“The Dream Manager concept provides a revolutionary way of reversing this crippling trend toward disengagement and demonstrates how organizations large and small can actively engage their people once again, thus creating a competitive advantage of monumental proportions,” Kelly says.

You might be asking, how exactly does the dream manager program work? At Infusionsoft, every employee has the opportunity to meet with Dan Ralphs, the company’s dream manager. He asks them to write down one hundred dreams and eventually they pick one dream together and start to develop a plan on how to accomplish it. From there they have follow up meetings and track the progress of where everyone is at in relation to achieving their dream for the year.

The absolute best way to transform a company is to transform the people within that company. Regardless of what industry you are in or how big or small your company is, one of the best ways to engage your people, create a healthy culture, and get everyone on board to work towards the organization’s grander vision is to care and help them achieve their personal dreams.

You may come up with something completely different than what Infusionsoft has adopted or what Mattew Kelly writes about in his book, The Dream Manager, but the one thing you can’t ignore is constantly looking for ways to grow and develop your people. After all, your company can only become as great as the people within it.

Source : https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/253067

Six Thinking Hats theory – decision making tool

Six Hats Thinking

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Developed by Dr. Edward de Bono, the “Six Thinking Hats” ™ technique is a framework designed to promote holistic and lateral thinking in decision-making and evaluation. Conducted alone or in group meetings, participants – project members, key decision-makers and stakeholders – are encouraged to cycle through different modalities of thinking using the metaphor of wearing different conceptual “hats”.

This approach seeks to combine the strengths of a range of different mental “states” which individuals instinctively tend towards – from rational and positive perspectives to emotional and intuitive, or from optimistic to pessimistic – by prompting participants to consider the same problem through a full spectrum of thinking styles in coming to common agreement on a decision or shared purpose.

Six “hats” are available to use, each identified by a different colour symbolic of a different style of thinking, and each dictating a unique mode of analysis. These include:

  • White hat: “Information”. Objectively consider available information, focusing only on data available, where gaps in existing knowledge exist, and what trends can be extrapolated from the information to hand.
  • Red hat: “Emotions”. Identify emotional reactions, judgments, suspicions and intuitions in oneself and others, separate from the objective data itself.
  • Black hat: “Negatives”. Raise and consider any potential flaws, risks, challenges and fears in a decision or plan in order to preempt them and avoid the dangers of over-optimism.
  • Yellow hat: “Positives”. Identify all optimistic, constructive aspects and suggestions regarding a decision or plan, with an eye towards building confidence and enthusiasm at the outset.
  • Green hat: “Creativity”. ‘Blue-sky’ thinking. Consider abstract thinking, digressions, alternative proposals, and provocative statements.
  • Blue hat: “Overview”. Consider the entire thinking process itself, i.e. ‘meta-cognition’. Review and assess the six hats session thus far, identify places where a specific modality of thinking needs expanding, revisiting, or balancing.

In a “six thinking hats” session, each of these hats is “worn” by participants, the process guided by a facilitator familiar with the option. These hats may be metaphorical, or even physical, and each change of “hat” indicates the next stage of the session. By the end of a successful “Six Hats” session, a particular decision or evaluation will thus have been considered from a range of viewpoints.

Example

The German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) employed the six hat methodology in their support of Sri Lankan government’s attempts to improve the planning and implementation of post-tsunami housing and reconstruction efforts. To this end, Sri Lankan and German counterparts cooperated in a series of joint project planning sessions which began with six thinking hat sessions. These sessions were used to identify and generate mutual understanding of the key issues which needed to be better understood and addressed in the reconstruction process.

(Source: Ben Ramalingam. “Tools for Knowledge and Learning”, Overseas Development Institute, 2006. Online at http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/details.asp?id=5231&title=six-thinking-hats-edward-de-bono)

Advice

Advice for USING this option (tips and traps)

  • Sessions should begin with a “blue hat” period, allowing participants to arrive at a consensus regarding how subsequent thinking should be accomplished – the other colors are then cycled through.
  • For evaluation and performance review, the recommended sequence is Blue, Red, White, Yellow, Black, Green. Evaluators should feel free, however, to adapt this to whichever sequence they find most effective in practice.
  • The facilitator should be ready to clarify each stage of thinking, plan the sequence of “hats” in advance, refocus discussions in line with each stage of thinking, and be prepared, if need be, change the thinking in line with participant feedback.

Advice for CHOOSING this option (tips and traps)

Do you have advice on choosing this option? Add it to the comments below.

Resources

Guides

Sources

De Bono, E. (1999) Six Thinking Hats, Revised Edition. Little, Brown and Co: London.

http://betterevaluation.org/evaluation-options/six_hats

 

Cultural differences – work of Geert Hofstede

Hofstede’s work is a great tool to compare key cultural differences between countries.

Click on the following link for a comparative study :

https://www.geert-hofstede.com/countries.html

Please select a country. After a first country has been selected, a second and even a third country can be chosen to be able to see a comparison of their scores.

geert

Pareto Principle

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What is the ‘Pareto Principle’


The Pareto principle is a principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The principle states that, for many phenomena, 20% of invested input is responsible for 80% of the results obtained. Put another way, 80% of consequences stem from 20% of the causes. Also referred to as the “Pareto rule” or the “80/20 rule”.

BREAKING DOWN ‘Pareto Principle’

This principle serves as a general reminder that the relationship between inputs and outputs is not balanced. For instance, the efforts of 20% of a corporation’s staff could drive 80% of the firm’s profits. In terms of personal time management, 80% of your work-related output could come from only 20% of your time at work.

The Pareto Principle can be applied in a wide range of areas such as manufacturing, management and human resources. In Pareto’s case, he used the rule to explain how 80% of property in Italy was owned by 20% of the country’s population.

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/paretoprinciple.asp

Social Entrepreneurs: Pioneering Social Change

Feb 18, 2009

The Skoll Foundation has recently completed a short film about the field of social entrepreneurship. Its a great overview of the progress made over the last three decades. It starts with Mohammad Yunus and includes interviews with a number of social entrepreneurs and others in the field, including Sally Osberg of the Skoll Foundation, Bill Drayton of Ashoka, Jacqueline Novogratz of the Acumen Fund, John Elkington of Volans, and author David Bornstein.

Draw your future – Take control of your life

One of my fave Ted Talks. Patti Dobrowolski’s energy is so inspiring. This video reminds us in just 10 minutes that if you can visualise what it is you truly want, you will make it become reality. Our brain has this amazing faculty to turn our mental dreams into actions. What you believe you can achieve, you will eventually achieve. Not overnight but one step at a time and you will get closer to what you want your life to be. Very uplifting video.

About me

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My name is Elodie Destruel. Truly a global mind. Currently based in the South of France, in Toulouse. Born in South Korea, raised in France, am French and I studied business in Australia. I graduated with a Master’s degree in Finance and an MBA in Management and HR from the Graduate School of Business of Newcastle (NSW Australia). I also have a Bachelor degreee in English studies, Literature and Politics. I started my own business CSC Consulting more than 10 years ago. CSC is a registered training organisation. 5 years after starting my first business I set up another language academy Toeic Institute. I am passionate about strategic management, human resources and everything related to entrepreneurship. I am here to share my passion for business. I will share a variety of articles and videos that I find truly inspiring in the fields of leadership, HR, economy, finance, new technologies, social entrepreneurship and personal development. I constantly seek to know more, be curious, keep learning and grow. Being an entrepreneur has been a fabulous journey for me and I owe that to the best leaders out there who have inspired me so much.

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